The People We Know & Love

Melin Tregwynt

Melin Tregwynt

My husband’s family began visiting St Davids in West Wales in the 1960s. They camped in a farmer’s field on the penninsular overlooking St Davids Head and still have a caravan there. We have photographs, from five decades, of toddlers and teenagers enjoying the beautiful beaches and sheltering from the inevitable weather of any west coastal environment.

Particularly wet days were spent with tetchy youngsters visiting local sites - amongst them the Melin Tregwynt Woollen Mill at Castlemorris. This collection of old industrial buildings with their purpose marked in a no-nonsense way on the doors housed fascinating machinery dedicated to the production of traditional woollen blankets with timeless Welsh patterns marked out in colours that reflected the stunning local landscape.

In the 1980s the family run business was given a new lease of life by Eifion Griffiths, with new designs and colours, and today they sell their beautiful products globally to discerning customers with an eye for quality, authenticity and style. As an interior designer these fantastic products have found their way into many of my clients’ homes. They never fail to please and I have had follow up calls to order more for other rooms or for gifts for friends.

We absolutely love everything about this company, their proud tradition, great quality of service and their standing in the contemporary design world. We are delighted to present our collection of gorgeous bags, blankets and cushions in the Know & Love house colours.

Kitty

Kitty

St Martins School of Art, Covent Garden in the 1980s was the halcyon equivalent of a playground for young dissenting creatives with a mission to disrupt and rebuild. Free from the shackles of a restricting curriculum and any visible signs of testing, for almost three years we ran riot through central London (a dream world for a wide eyed Nottingham lass like myself) questioning everything and revelling in the joy of finding ourselves in such a wonderful environment. Our incredible tutors ran a superb course which encouraged expression and nurtured talent. There were just 30 of us in my year and what a close knit bunch we were. Three couples are still married and friendships endure with regular reunions.

Kitty was to be found at the centre of this happy group and has continued to practice her typographic skills in the form of letterpress printing. After retiring early from the cut and thrust of London design consultancy life, to move to the country and bring up a family, she eventually returned to her initial love of typographic design via the craft-inspired route of letterpress print, using old cases of wood and metal type, and a small Farley hand proofing press to create simple and strong designs. As well as cards she has also produced souvenir posters for Glastonbury Festival and sets and prints her clients’ poems, producing unique, one-off framed pieces.

I love the selection of her cards we are selling at Know & Love. Simple, fun, direct images, perfectly executed and lovingly printed onto beautiful card. Ideal for that quick message to a friend.

Manufacture De Digoin

Manufacture De Digoin

Who else has found themselves in one of those terracotta pot yards whilst on holiday? We were camping in Anduze in the south of France in 1998 and, on a bored afternoon, wandered into one for no reason at all. I find those places rather depressing in their ‘sameness’ but, miraculously, we stumbled upon a beautiful set of stoneware bowls, jugs and pots. They were simple with classic proportions and nested beautifully inside each other. No chintzy painted flowers here, these were workmanlike vessels with a pared down honesty. We bought the lot! 18 years later we still eat our morning porridge out of these bowls every day.

So it was only natural that when I launched Know & Love these bowls should be a part of the story. I was delighted to track them down from the makers marks and to subsequently discover that in 2014 this traditional French pottery company, established in 1875, was saved from going under by Corrinne Jordan and brought up to date with new colour ranges and beautiful marketing.

The pieces are still produced by hand, the beautiful bowls, which I later discovered are traditional Parisian butchers terrine bowls, bear the blemishes, brush strokes and drips which evidence their ancient manufacturing process.

These items are not just aesthetically pleasing; the large bowls are made for hugging with one arm whilst stirring a stiff fruit cake mix with the other. The mustard pot will keep your conserves at a cool temperature and the olive oil bottle, unchanged in over 100 years, is a lesson in functionality.

These are kitchen staples - hard wearing, hard working and hard to resist!